Restaurant owners talk about the struggles of the hospitality industry

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Upstate restaurants are struggling with staff shortages, with some even forced to close permanently. Le Terrier d’Augusta joined the list by closing its doors on Wednesday. The owner said his situation was just a taste of what the hospitality industry is still facing since the start of the pandemic. “We are all feeling the shortage of staff and one question we all ask ourselves is where is everyone?” said owner Joshua Beeby. Beeby opened The Burrow in Augusta six months before the pandemic. He was hoping to catch the lighting in a bottle to join his other two restaurants, The Trappe Door and Barley’s. However, shortly after the pandemic began, he said it was the beginning of the end for The Burrow. “It all went down today, and it’s the worst feeling I’ve ever had,” Beeby said. Beeby added that his restaurant is just one example of what restaurateurs face. “There’s not a restaurant I go to these days that doesn’t have a hiring sign. Now they’ve all been replaced with ‘please be patient with our staff because we “I can’t do better,” Beeby said. Supply chain issues also continue to hit the industry hard, forcing owners to make tough decisions. even ask why. You know, why don’t we have that? Because you can handle its supply shortages,” Beeby said. As The Burrow and many other restaurants close, new ones keep popping up as others take the plunge. Beeby says he won’t don’t know why but know the journey won’t be easy.” If you’re going to work in this industry and you’re going to survive in this industry, it’s here (points heart). It’s not here (points head). It’s a bit of both, but you gotta love it. It’s a brutal business and you gotta love it,” Beeby said. Beeby said some of The Burrow’s staff would be moving to The Trappe Door or Barely’s. He added that while he’s sad The Burrow has closed, he’s ready to fall in love all over again with an industry he’s been part of for over 30 years.

Upstate restaurants are struggling with staff shortages, with some even forced to close permanently.

Le Terrier d’Augusta joined the list by closing its doors on Wednesday.

The owner said his situation was just a taste of what the hospitality industry is still facing since the start of the pandemic.

“We are all feeling the shortage of staff and one question we all ask ourselves is where is everyone?” said owner Joshua Beeby.

Beeby opened The Burrow in Augusta six months before the pandemic.

He hoped to catch the lighting in a bottle to reach his two other restaurants, La Trappe Door and Barley’s.

However, shortly after the pandemic began, he said it was the beginning of the end for The Burrow.

“Everything went well today, and it was the worst feeling I’ve ever had,” Beeby said.

Beeby added that his restaurant is just one of many examples of what restaurateurs face.

“There’s not a restaurant I go to these days that doesn’t have a hiring sign. Now they’ve all been replaced with ‘please be patient with our staff because we do our best and we can just “I can’t do better,” Beeby said.

Supply chain issues also continue to hit the industry hard, forcing owners to make tough decisions.

“I don’t even ask why anymore. You know, why don’t we have that? Because you can handle his supply shortages,” Beeby said.

As The Burrow and many other restaurants close, new ones continue to pop up as more people take the plunge.

Beeby says he doesn’t know why but knows the journey won’t be easy.

“If you’re going to work in this industry and you’re going to survive in this industry, it’s here (points heart). It’s not here (points head). It’s a bit of both, but it takes It’s a brutal business and you have to love it,” Beeby said.

Beeby said some staff from The Burrow would be moving to The Trappe Door or Barely’s. He added that while he’s sad The Burrow has closed, he’s ready to fall in love with an industry he’s been part of for over 30 years all over again.

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